National endowment for the arts purpose

+ Learn more on Soundfly: Leave standard behind, and explore alternate guitar tunings with Soundfly’s new series of bite-sized courses, Alternate Tunings for the Creative Guitarist!

Brad Pack is an award-winning audio engineer, writer, and educator based in Chicago, IL. Brad holds a Master’s degree in Electronic Media Production. When he’s not in front of his laptop, Brad can be found in the mosh pit.

I have been improvising with instruments for 25 years now, in many different idioms: blues, rock, jazz, country, and various kinds of electronic music. Scratching is very different from playing an instrument. Intellectually scratching is something like playing loops in Ableton Live’s Session View, but it’s more like playing an instrument, while triggering loops is more like composing.

Early 2000s rappers

Ischi’s website welcomes visitors with a video clip of him and the chickens as soon as you enter. He also has a new song out called “The Chicken and the Egg,” but it doesn’t seem to be streamable online — although you can hear a 30-second excerpt here.

Secondly, be careful not to over-compress any of your tracks and, in particular, not to add heavy compression, limiting, or maximizing plug-ins on your master output channel. Leave the master compression adjustments for your mastering engineer, just like Joe Lambert says in the above video. Make sure to set all your volume faders to keep everything “under the red” so you avoid any clipping distortion.

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Okay! Now, Don’t Cry, but that’s it. Ain’t Got No Tunes Left to Spy, Sad!, and it all wasn’t exactly a No Brainer, but I hope that if you’ve gotten this far, you were able to catch at least a little Thunder in your bottle.

Rappers with criminal records

Without the internet around to provide an unbroken timeline of artistic events to a potentially endless landscape of wandering eyes, records that couldn’t achieve access to a viable fanbase in the 1980s have mostly, inevitably found themselves buried in the sands of time forever. Many creative masterworks, no matter how well-appreciated at the time of their initial pressing — if mismanaged by independent, boutique labels that couldn’t stay afloat financially — have either approached or gone completely off the cliff edge of existence. But thanks to the interplay between user-submitted content on the web and the way platforms help listeners discover it, some records do actually manage to climb back out of the sand.

While the PR-40 looks like a traditional condenser mic, it’s actually a dynamic microphone, which makes it an excellent choice for podcasting. Dynamic microphones are less sensitive than condenser microphones and capture less ambient noise. The PR-40’s fixed cardioid pickup pattern further helps reduce background noise for a crystal-clear broadcast. With an internal shock mount, the PR-40 is fully protected from handling noise, while the dual mesh filters prevent plosives. An extended frequency range helps capture that classic “radio voice” sound.

Jeremy is a Montreal-based musician, sound artist and improviser who loves giving advice to emerging artists on how to make their tours more effective. He writes, records and performs electroacoustic “concrète” music for tape, oscillators and amplified objects and surfaces, as well as solo guitar. He has performed and released material throughout Europe and the UK, Asia, the US and Canada, mostly with his trio Sontag Shogun.

Streaming platforms have long been a source of controversy because of how little they pay artists, but some offer other advantages. Spotify’s Artist Insights feature is a powerful analytics tool designed to help musicians understand who’s listening to their music the most over the platform. It tracks listener information like gender, age, location, and through what source someone discovered your music.

In his book The Meaning of Human Existence, Pulitzer Prize-winning biologist Edward O. Wilson argues that “healthy people believe intuitively that they can hear every almost every sound. However… we walk through nature like a deaf person on the streets of New York, sensing only a few vibrations, able to interpret almost nothing.” So I hope your cat or dog is a music fan, because they are far more likely to appreciate the crisp top-end preserved in your favorite lossless audio format than you are.