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John Entwistle almost didn’t make this list, by virtue of being, well, too good. There are so many great Who songs to choose from, but one melody that tends to stick in my head is the pentatonic major run heard behind the “I tip my hat” refrain in this song. The riff starts at the relative minor and runs down to the root, hitting all five notes of the scale. It’s a simple sequence, but I’ve noticed that scalar walk-downs to the root pretty much always sound good on the bass. (For example, check out the choruses of the Beatles’ “Helter Skelter” and Kiss’ “Shout It Out Loud”). Entwistle repeats this motif several times throughout the chorus with slight variations that keep it continually compelling.

Touring is great. But it can very quickly turn into exhaustive, monotonous work. Here are 10 great tips to keep things interesting and fun on the road.

Decades before he was laying down the bass track for Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky,” consummate studio session man Nathan East was playing on hit records left and right. A song that is a little bit hard rock, a little bit R&B, done by a band that until then was sort of new-wave-ish, “Would I Lie to You” seems like a fitting way to end this list.

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As they used to say on MTV, “Too much is never enough” — especially when it comes to the ways you can re-record and sell your music. Top-selling artists release multiple versions of both hits and deep cuts to present different versions of their songs and put a new spin on lesser-known tracks. You can remix a song and take the lyrics away, and release an instrumental version you could license to film or TV programs. Or how about stripping down your sound and releasing an acoustic, unplugged version?

Because there’s nothing else that I can do                            B      

The Arctic Monkeys’ video is highly engaging and memorable. The song is about a one-night stand, and while the video portrays the same concept, it’s framed in a new, creative way. The whole video involves one camera and two actors, and proves that an inexpensive music video can be a success with a truly well-considered, compelling story.

Now be honest. When you read that title you were flooded with a bit of nostalgia, right? Even if you’ve never really used a cassette to play your music, odds are you have childhood memories of your parents popping in the Twisted Sister Christmas tape or remember wishing your crush would make you a mix tape that held all the best Cure songs

In the above video, courtesy of our brand new Mainstage course, TheoryWorks II: Sight Singing & Harmony Essentials, New York City vocal teacher and actor Amy Marie Stewart gives her take on why singing actors need to be able to grasp at least a fundamental understanding of music theory in order to maximize their chances of nailing an audition.

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No classic song is safe from the cover treatment… but how many cover versions are actually interesting to listen to? We delve in and pick out our top 10.

The course goes deep in guiding students through the methods of learning how to sight sing more fluidly by mastering intervals and grasping harmony and chord theory, and offers tips and surefire strategies for making audition cuts (or dealing with cuts when they’re made on the fly!).

Planning to take your creative or compositional practice out of the house sometime soon? These gorgeous residency locations will have your jaw on the floor.

This autumn, we’re launching a brand new mentored online course teaching you how to get your home-recorded vocals sounding like the pros, check it out!

Many artists brag about getting very little sleep because they’re so committed to winning. And that’s great. Good for them. And, yeah, you may have to go through seasons where you’re not getting a ton of sleep. Maybe you’re working on a project that you’re super passionate about and it’s taking some time. That’s fine, but give yourself a break every now and then.

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